Holding you back in your career

Banish these behav.iors to make 2017 the year you finally move up the ladder

1. YOUR EMAIL ETIQUETTE SUCKS.

Think an emoticon-filled message is the only email mistake you can make? A terse message can be just as bad, says career expert J.T. O’Donnell, founder and CEO of Work It Daily.

Emails that get right to the point—say, without a salutation like “hi” or “hello”— and jump right to a demand can rub your coworkers the wrong way.  Even though you may have just been trying to be concise, you actually come off as an a-hole—or, at the very least, apathetic. “It comes across as a lack of trying or effort,” O’Donnell says.

Plus, it might show that you don’t feel a connection to your employer, in which case, why should that employer invest in you? So make sure to add just enough pleasantries in your exchange to make it seem like you care about the person. Always include a greeting, and remember your “pleases” and “thank yous,” she says.

2. YOU SKIP HAPPY HOUR.

Very few people actually enjoy those happy hour meet-and-greets, but forming connections within your industry are crucial to your career. That way, not only do you stay on top of your industry’s curve, but you also can take note of what other people in your industry are doing so you don’t get passed by.

“People forget that they need to continue networking when they have a job,” says career expert Abby Kohut, president of career site Absolutely Abby.

If you’re not networking while employed, when you quit—or lose—your current role, you’ll have to start over from scratch. So keep up your networking by joining at least one professional association and going to an event once a month. And if your current company offers training opportunities or internal happy hours, hit them up, too.

Beauty lip trend

A quick scroll through Instagram may leave you with the impression that full lips are in style at this very moment, but a new scientific analysis of fashion models says that the trend is surprisingly absent.

One explanation for the results may be that the fashion industry is no longer driving beauty trends — instead, it’s possible that celebrities may be the new driving factor instead, according to the study.

Recently, women seeking cosmestic procedures have shown a preference for fuller lips , according to the study, which was published Jan. 12 as a research letter in the journal JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery .

The researchers, led by Dr. Prem Tripathi, a resident in otolaryngology, head and neck surgery at the University of California, Irvine, attribute the rise in this preference in part to changes in the demographics of both consumers and of models and celebrities, as well as to the low cost and safety of injectable lip fillers.

However, the fashion industry has often played a role in what women seek from cosmetic procedures, the authors wrote in the study. Because tastemakers mold opinions through the media, and in particular, through print media, the researchers decided to look for evidence of trends in lip size in the pages of Vogue magazine , according to the study.

In the study, researchers analyzed the lips of fashion models who appeared in Vogue magazine between 1960 and 2011. They included images in which the model’s face had the following characteristics: It spanned at least one-third the height of the page, the model’s lips were “at rest” — in other words, the model wasn’t smiling or pouting, for example — and the lip shape wasn’t altered with makeup . There were a total of 353 images in the study.

By digitally scanning the images, the researchers were able measure the size of the models’ upper and lower lips, as well as compare the size of the upper lip to the lower lip.

They found that, from 1960 to 2011, neither the upper nor the lower lip increased in size over time, and the ratio of upper-lip size to lower-lip size also didn’t change. The average upper-lip to lower-lip ratio was 0.68, which corresponds to a 47 percent larger lower lip compared to the upper lip, the researchers added.

The researchers noted that their findings were not what they expected. “If the frequently cited trend toward fuller lips truly exists, why is this not quantitatively seen in Vogue?” they wrote. Indeed, “a cursory glance through [the magazine] leaves the reader with a variety of shiny, lip-center images of fashion models,” they wrote.

Treat with opioid epidemic

The grim faces of the nation’s opioid epidemic—an overdosing parent slumped in the front seat of a car, mouth agape, with a neglected child in the rear seat—have become too familiar in recent years. More babies are now being born with narcotics in their systems, foster care is strained, and growing numbers of grandparents are raising the children of their own addicted children.

With an estimated 2.6 million people addicted to opioids—including heroin, fentanyl and oxycodone—the toll is daunting. Fatal opioid overdoses have risen from around 8,200 in 1999 to 33,000 in 2015, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, making them a leading cause of accidental death. Last year, deaths from heroin slightly edged out gun homicides for the first time since the government began keeping such data.

Politicians and health agencies are deeply concerned. They overwhelmingly call for a “public-health approach” to the epidemic, emphasizing treatment with anti-addiction medications. As the U.S. surgeon general recently implored, it’s time for us to view addiction “not as a moral failing but as a chronic illness.”

As a psychiatrist who has treated people addicted to heroin for more than 25 years, I endorse treatment over punishment. But the medicalized rhetoric of the public-health establishment—namely, that addiction is a brain disease in which neural circuits are “hijacked” by drugs—oversimplifies the problem.

Embrace of superheroes

A new study finds that children who are “highly engaged” with superheroes were more likely to be aggressive a year later. Researchers twice evaluated 240 preschoolers and kindergartners at four sites across the western US, analyzing their levels of three types of aggression at both points: physical (hitting, kicking), relational (hurting others’ feelings through behaviors like ignoring), and verbal (name-calling). Read this Obat Pembesar Penis for make superhero

Parents reported on their kids’ favorite superheroes and just how big of a fan their kids were—how often they watched movies or shows featuring superheroes, for example, and how strongly the kids identified with their favorite hero.

The children also answered questions. In the end, researchers found that kids who were more engaged with superheroes were more likely to be physically and relationally aggressive at their second evaluation. please visit Pembesar Penis

Also troubling: The children were not found to be emulating superheroes in other ways, such as by being more likely to help or defend others, Pacific Standard reports.

“Children in early childhood may be particularly at risk for the negative effects of media violence exposure when the superhero medium is emphasized,” the researchers conclude.

They theorize that at such a young age, it may be tricky for kids to “disentangle” the aggressive behaviors superheroes demonstrate from the altruistic, “pro-social” behaviors.

They also speculate that exposure to superheroes may be more problematic for children than exposure to other types of aggression in media because parents tend to “endorse and support” a child’s love of superheroes, in the hopes that their kids might learn to help others, Psych Central reports. read Obat Pembesar Alat Vital Pria

Tips for success before childbirth

The grueling, intense pain that comes along with labor is something pregnant women are warned about and told to prepare for and fear. It’s how childbirth is almost always portrayed in movies and a part of most women’s birth stories.

Some women however, say labor and childbirth doesn’t have to be this way and the experience can be pleasurable— even orgasmic.

When Kenya Stevens, of Asheville, North Carolina, went into labor with her first child, she was prepared to use meditation— which she’d practiced for years— to help her through her planned home birth.

Something the now-42-year-old hadn’t prepared for however, was that when it came time to push, her contractions stimulated an orgasm.

“I was laughing and crawling around the room as if I was intoxicated,” Stevens recalled. “I am in bliss,” she recalled telling her mom during the birth.

With her second child, she labored quickly but the feeling was the same.

“I felt like a tiger in the forest, just pushing and enjoying the flow,” she said.

When she gave birth to her third child, Stevens labored in the shower and enjoyed the water running down her back and the pleasure that ensued.

“Because I had the breathing techniques and the understanding, I could easily shift into orgasm the third time,” she said.

Orgasmic birth and “birthgasms”
“Giving birth is a part of our sexuality as women,” said Debra Pascali-Bonaro, director of the film “Orgasmic Birth,” and co-author of “Orgasmic Birth: Your Guide to a Safe, Satisfying and Pleasurable Birth Experience.”

“The term ‘orgasmic’ also includes all kinds of pleasure from experiencing birth with joy, ecstasy, intimacy, connection [and] bliss because so much of our language around birth is about pain and fear and we don’t give voice to the many other emotions that can be felt,” she said.

 

Eye disease treat

A new technique using stem cells can restore vision in mice that have end-stage eye disease, a condition that is thought to bring irreversible vision loss.

Researchers used stem cells to grow new retina tissue in a lab, and then transplanted that tissue into mice that had end-stage retinal degeneration. More than 40 percent of the mice gained the ability to see light as the result of the procedure, the researchers said.

This is the first time researchers have successfully transplanted the cells that sense light, the retina’s light receptors, so that these cells connect to the host’s nervous system and send signals to the host’s brain, the researchers said.

“We were at first very excited to see that the transplants do robustly respond to light,” Dr. Michiko Mandai, the first author of the paper and a deputy project leader at the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology in Japan, told Live Science.

The researchers hope to eventually increase the number of connections between the cells in the host’s degenerated retina and the stem cell transplants, Mandai said. This could allow the mice to see not only light, but also a large figure or movement, Mandai said.

The retina is the layer of tissue at the back of the eye that actually senses light and passes signals on to the brain, where the information is processed and an image is perceived . In individuals with retinal degeneration, the light-sensing cells are gradually lost, eventually leading to total blindness, Mandai said. Age-related macular degeneration , the most prevalent type of retinal degeneration, affects approximately 15 million people in the U.S. and 170 million people worldwide.

In the study, researchers converted skin cells from an adult mouse into mouse induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The scientists then converted these stem cells into retinal tissue and transplanted the tissue into mice that had end-stage retinal degeneration.

The researchers used what is called a shuttle avoidance test to determine whether the mice could see light. The test involves a sound- and light-insulated box with two chambers, separated by a wall with a small opening that allows mice to move between the two compartments.

Maiming the pets

Of all the consequences of the nation’s opioid epidemic — which last year killed 33,091 people, or one overdose death every 15 minutes — the strangest may be how it has increased the abuse of dogs.

Addicts discovered that the painkiller tramadol, prescribed by veterinarians across the country for pets with arthritis or other debilitating ailments, is the same drug prescribed to human cancer patients to dull their pain.

And compared to the more widely-abused opioid oxycontin, which can cost up to $10 for a 10 milligram pill, tramadol is dirt cheap. It wholesales for less than $25 for a 1,000-pill bottle.

Its inexpensive price has already made it a scourge throughout the third world — and now the problem is moving into developed countries.

In Northern Ireland on Wednesday, one coroner said more teens there now die from tramadol than from morphine or heroin.

Here in the US, opioid abusers are finding veterinarians can be easily fooled into prescribing the drug — even if it means, at times, purposely maiming or abusing their dog to pull off their ruse.

“They’ve gotten very sophisticated in how they obtain drugs and go about their activities,” said Jim Arnold, the chief of policy and liaison for the diversion control division at the Drug Enforcement Administration.

Meningitis and the death

Health officials said a California Bay Area woman’s death was likely caused by bacterial meningitis, which would make it the second fatality linked to the illness in one week. David Robson, Laura Robson’s brother, told a local news outlet that his sister had complained of a headache and a slight fever before her death.

Robson reportedly was already dead when she was found in the back of a San Francisco Muni bus, which was located in Daly City at the time, NBC Bay Area reported. A preliminary investigation said the 53-year-old’s cause of death was likely meningitis, David told the news outlet, but a complete autopsy is being conducted by the San Mateo County Coroner’s Office.

David and his 5-year-old son received antibiotic treatment as a precaution, NBC Bay Area reported.

On January 7, Seven Phillips, a 48-year-old San Rafael resident, died of bacterial meningitis. As a precaution, more than 200 individuals who attended classes at the SoulCycle location which Phillips frequented were contacted by the spin studio. Phillips contracted the infection between December 31 and January 7, but did not contract it at the popular fitness studio. No one has reported symptoms so far, the New York Post reported.

“While the rider did not contract the infection at our studio, we have nonetheless been in constant communication with the Department of Health which has emphasized that there is no evidence of any health risk to our riders,” SoulCycle said in a statement, according to NBC Bay Area.

The disease is rare and risk of infection is low. It spreads through respiratory droplets, coughing and sneezing and can stay on surfaces.

David told NBC Bay Area that his sister had not attended a SoulCycle class at the studio Phillips had visited.

Swaps that anyone can digest

Hippocrates once said, “Let thy food be thy medicine!” but for the estimated 45 million Americans who suffer from Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), that can be a tough pill to swallow. Symptoms of IBS can be uncomfortable, frustrating, and painful — and are brought on directly by the foods consumed. It doesn’t help that there is no specific test to diagnose IBS either. IBS is a sort of “subjective” condition where a lot of symptoms are clumped into one to form a diagnosis. Fortunately for those suffering from IBS, food may actually be “thy medicine”.

A new eating plan has been created, and proven with great clinical significance to help appease IBS symptoms. This belly-saving way of eating is based on “FODMAPs,” specifically “low FODMAP” foods. A 2014 Australian clinical trial published in the Journal of Gastroenterology has shown following a low FODMAP diet may reduce IBS symptoms by as much as 50 percent. The term “FODMAP” is an acronym that stands for “”Fermentable, Oligo-, Di-, Mono-saccharides And Polyols.”

This plan identifies short chain carbohydrates that are potentially difficult for people to digest and ferment in the large intestine causing gas and other digestive stress. These short-chain carbohydrates include excess fructose, lactose, fructans, galactans, and polyols. Such carbohydrates are considered “high FODMAP” foods and thus should be avoided by those with IBS.

No one likes hearing the word “no,” so instead of telling you what you can’t eat, here’s what you can eat. Simple swaps (high FODMAPs out for low) that may make a huge difference in ways of digestion include:

1       Apples out for blueberries: An apple a day may keep the doctor away, but it may not keep IBS symptoms at bay. Apples areeliminated in a low FODMAP diet because they contain an excessive amount of fructose. Fructose is a type of sugar found in fruits. Foods that have excess fructose are considered high FODMAP and should be avoided by people who suffer from IBS. Such foods include apples, watermelon, cherries, mango, agave, and honey. Some fruits have less fructose than others though, and can safely be incorporated in a low FODMAP eating plan.Blueberries (20 blueberries), grapes (1 cup), orange (1 small), and kiwi (2 small)all make the low FODMAP list. Although these fruits are lower in fructose, people who suffer from IBS should still limit their overall fruit consumption as fructose in lower amounts can still add up when consumed in large quantities.

2        Artichokes out for eggplant: Foods high in fructan, a substance similar to fructose, and found in many vegetables and grains, are also high FODMAP and thus should be avoided. Foods high in fructans to avoid include: artichokes, garlic, leeks, scallions, onion, peas, and certain grains, nuts, and legumes. Before you swear off salads for life, know that there are plenty of low fructan vegetables that can be enjoyed by all. Eggplant, arugula, zucchini, sweet potato, spinach, tomatoes, and cucumbers all get the green light for low FODMAP dieters.

3       Pasta out for spaghetti squash: Aside from being high in carbohydrates and deliciousness, pasta is also high in fructans. For this reason, pasta is a no-go when following a low FODMAP plan. Other grains in addition to pasta that must be avoided include wheat and rye such as bread, crackers, cookies, and couscous. To get your pasta fix, you can make spaghetti squash or zucchini noodles, as both zucchini and squash are low FODMAP foods, or use a gluten-free pasta like quinoa pasta. Other suitable low FODMAP grain products and grains include gluten-free bread, millet bread, rice, and spelt bread.

Know the potentially exposed to tuberculosis

Health officials in Ohio said nearly 50 people may have been exposed to tuberculosis (TB) in the neonatal intensive care unit at an Ohio hospital by a patient unaware of their diagnosis at the time. Those at risk of exposure include infants, visitors and staff, Fox 8 reported.

Officials said the person, who was identified as a Summa County resident, visited Akron City Hospital in November and December but was not diagnosed until January 3. TB bacteria typically attacks the lungs but can affect the kidney, spine and brain, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Not all who are infected with TB exhibit signs of illness, but those that do may complain of a persistent cough, pain in the chest, blood in phlegm, weakness, weight loss, loss of appetite, fever, chills or sweating at night.

“The risk for infection is low, but because TB can be more serious in young children we would like to evaluate these infants and begin them on a protective antibiotic,” Dr. John Bower, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at Akron Children’s Hospital, told Fox 8. “We have set up a clinic and are providing this care at no cost to our patient families.”

While officials stressed that there is no risk to the general public, caregivers, older children and other individuals who visited the unit during the same time period as the infected patient are encouraged to get tested for TB in 6 to 8 weeks.