Monthly Archives: December 2016

The Cause of Cats Quarantines

This is a cat-astrophe!

A rare strain of bird flu has swept through the Big Apple’s animal shelters — and city officials have locked up about 500 felines in a quarantine facility to stop the outbreak.

So far, 386 of the purring patients have tested positive for the H7N2 virus — the first time the disease has even been found in cats, officials said.

Two of the cats have died, along with the original host: a Bronx shelter adoptee named Alfred, who became sick in October.

But workers have no plans to put down any of the sick cats and instead will treat them for the virus, which has baffled the medical staff.

It was unclear how Alfred caught H7N2, which remains contagious for up to three weeks, officials said.

Even though it is considered only slightly transmittable to humans, workers are taking no chances — wearing hazmat suits whenever they are in the room with the furballs.

The cats were rounded up from shelters in all corners of the city over the last two months and taken to a makeshift facility in an industrial section of Long Island City, Queens, set up by Animal Care Centers of New York City and the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals.

The sick felines are being tested by workers from the Shelter Medicine Program at the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine and the process could take up to three months, officials said.

Talk About The Meningitis

Health officials say that a Marin County resident who worked out at a popular indoor group cycling gym has died of meningitis.

Marin County public health officer Dr. Matt Willis said SoulCycle had supplied him with a list of about 200 people with whom the deceased shared classes.

The disease is rare and risk of infection is low. It spreads through respiratory droplets, coughing and sneezing and can stay on surfaces.

The death was reported to the health department on Tuesday.

“This would be about 10 to 12 weeks after the last potential exposure, which is the time for the body to develop its response to the TB bacteria,” Dr. Margo Erme, medical director of the Summit County Health Department, told Fox 8.

Officials said the person, who was identified as a Summa County resident, visited Akron City Hospital in November and December but was not diagnosed until January 3. TB bacteria typically attacks the lungs but can affect the kidney, spine and brain, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Not all who are infected with TB exhibit signs of illness, but those that do may complain of a persistent cough, pain in the chest, blood in phlegm, weakness, weight loss, loss of appetite, fever, chills or sweating at night.