Monthly Archives: October 2016

Beauty lip trend

A quick scroll through Instagram may leave you with the impression that full lips are in style at this very moment, but a new scientific analysis of fashion models says that the trend is surprisingly absent.

One explanation for the results may be that the fashion industry is no longer driving beauty trends — instead, it’s possible that celebrities may be the new driving factor instead, according to the study.

Recently, women seeking cosmestic procedures have shown a preference for fuller lips , according to the study, which was published Jan. 12 as a research letter in the journal JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery .

The researchers, led by Dr. Prem Tripathi, a resident in otolaryngology, head and neck surgery at the University of California, Irvine, attribute the rise in this preference in part to changes in the demographics of both consumers and of models and celebrities, as well as to the low cost and safety of injectable lip fillers.

However, the fashion industry has often played a role in what women seek from cosmetic procedures, the authors wrote in the study. Because tastemakers mold opinions through the media, and in particular, through print media, the researchers decided to look for evidence of trends in lip size in the pages of Vogue magazine , according to the study.

In the study, researchers analyzed the lips of fashion models who appeared in Vogue magazine between 1960 and 2011. They included images in which the model’s face had the following characteristics: It spanned at least one-third the height of the page, the model’s lips were “at rest” — in other words, the model wasn’t smiling or pouting, for example — and the lip shape wasn’t altered with makeup . There were a total of 353 images in the study.

By digitally scanning the images, the researchers were able measure the size of the models’ upper and lower lips, as well as compare the size of the upper lip to the lower lip.

They found that, from 1960 to 2011, neither the upper nor the lower lip increased in size over time, and the ratio of upper-lip size to lower-lip size also didn’t change. The average upper-lip to lower-lip ratio was 0.68, which corresponds to a 47 percent larger lower lip compared to the upper lip, the researchers added.

The researchers noted that their findings were not what they expected. “If the frequently cited trend toward fuller lips truly exists, why is this not quantitatively seen in Vogue?” they wrote. Indeed, “a cursory glance through [the magazine] leaves the reader with a variety of shiny, lip-center images of fashion models,” they wrote.

Treat with opioid epidemic

The grim faces of the nation’s opioid epidemic—an overdosing parent slumped in the front seat of a car, mouth agape, with a neglected child in the rear seat—have become too familiar in recent years. More babies are now being born with narcotics in their systems, foster care is strained, and growing numbers of grandparents are raising the children of their own addicted children.

With an estimated 2.6 million people addicted to opioids—including heroin, fentanyl and oxycodone—the toll is daunting. Fatal opioid overdoses have risen from around 8,200 in 1999 to 33,000 in 2015, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, making them a leading cause of accidental death. Last year, deaths from heroin slightly edged out gun homicides for the first time since the government began keeping such data.

Politicians and health agencies are deeply concerned. They overwhelmingly call for a “public-health approach” to the epidemic, emphasizing treatment with anti-addiction medications. As the U.S. surgeon general recently implored, it’s time for us to view addiction “not as a moral failing but as a chronic illness.”

As a psychiatrist who has treated people addicted to heroin for more than 25 years, I endorse treatment over punishment. But the medicalized rhetoric of the public-health establishment—namely, that addiction is a brain disease in which neural circuits are “hijacked” by drugs—oversimplifies the problem.

Embrace of superheroes

A new study finds that children who are “highly engaged” with superheroes were more likely to be aggressive a year later. Researchers twice evaluated 240 preschoolers and kindergartners at four sites across the western US, analyzing their levels of three types of aggression at both points: physical (hitting, kicking), relational (hurting others’ feelings through behaviors like ignoring), and verbal (name-calling). Read this Obat Pembesar Penis for make superhero

Parents reported on their kids’ favorite superheroes and just how big of a fan their kids were—how often they watched movies or shows featuring superheroes, for example, and how strongly the kids identified with their favorite hero.

The children also answered questions. In the end, researchers found that kids who were more engaged with superheroes were more likely to be physically and relationally aggressive at their second evaluation. please visit Pembesar Penis

Also troubling: The children were not found to be emulating superheroes in other ways, such as by being more likely to help or defend others, Pacific Standard reports.

“Children in early childhood may be particularly at risk for the negative effects of media violence exposure when the superhero medium is emphasized,” the researchers conclude.

They theorize that at such a young age, it may be tricky for kids to “disentangle” the aggressive behaviors superheroes demonstrate from the altruistic, “pro-social” behaviors.

They also speculate that exposure to superheroes may be more problematic for children than exposure to other types of aggression in media because parents tend to “endorse and support” a child’s love of superheroes, in the hopes that their kids might learn to help others, Psych Central reports. read Obat Pembesar Alat Vital Pria

Tips for success before childbirth

The grueling, intense pain that comes along with labor is something pregnant women are warned about and told to prepare for and fear. It’s how childbirth is almost always portrayed in movies and a part of most women’s birth stories.

Some women however, say labor and childbirth doesn’t have to be this way and the experience can be pleasurable— even orgasmic.

When Kenya Stevens, of Asheville, North Carolina, went into labor with her first child, she was prepared to use meditation— which she’d practiced for years— to help her through her planned home birth.

Something the now-42-year-old hadn’t prepared for however, was that when it came time to push, her contractions stimulated an orgasm.

“I was laughing and crawling around the room as if I was intoxicated,” Stevens recalled. “I am in bliss,” she recalled telling her mom during the birth.

With her second child, she labored quickly but the feeling was the same.

“I felt like a tiger in the forest, just pushing and enjoying the flow,” she said.

When she gave birth to her third child, Stevens labored in the shower and enjoyed the water running down her back and the pleasure that ensued.

“Because I had the breathing techniques and the understanding, I could easily shift into orgasm the third time,” she said.

Orgasmic birth and “birthgasms”
“Giving birth is a part of our sexuality as women,” said Debra Pascali-Bonaro, director of the film “Orgasmic Birth,” and co-author of “Orgasmic Birth: Your Guide to a Safe, Satisfying and Pleasurable Birth Experience.”

“The term ‘orgasmic’ also includes all kinds of pleasure from experiencing birth with joy, ecstasy, intimacy, connection [and] bliss because so much of our language around birth is about pain and fear and we don’t give voice to the many other emotions that can be felt,” she said.